S.U.R.F

Scientists with the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) hope to revolutionize our understanding of the role neutrinos play in the creation of the universe. Using the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), they'll shoot a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, 800 miles through the earth to detectors deep underground at Sanford Lab in Lead, South Dakota. LBNF will provide the infrastructure at Fermilab and Sanford Lab to support the DUNE detectors. And if a core-collapse supernova occurs in the Milky Way, we just might be able to see inside a newly formed neutron star and, potentially, witness the birth of a black hole.

DUNE scientists answer your questions about the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

Scientists with the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) hope to revolutionize our understanding of the role neutrinos play in the creation of the universe. Using the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), they'll shoot a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, 800 miles through the earth to detectors deep underground at Sanford Lab in Lead, South Dakota. 

Join us to hear from an assortment of DUNE collaborators as they explore a variety of questions about the experiment.

Ryan Patterson

Ryan Patterson

Dr. Ryan Patterson's current research focuses on the neutrino sector of particle physics, addressing questions of weak mixing, neutrino masses, CP violation and physics beyond the Standard Model, including the use of neutrinos to explore supernova dynamics and nuclear structure, broad searches for signatures of new physics and the development of detectors and analytical methods for particle physics research.